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Table 2 Changes in diagnoses in relation to the clinical evaluation setting

From: Rapid referral for headache management from emergency department to headache centre: four years data

DIAGNOSIS TRIAGE nurse ED doctor Headache centre Concordance TRIAGE - headache centre
(244 patients) (244 patients) (240 patients) (κ; p - value)
Headache 155 (63.6) 128 (52.5)  
Migraine without aura 22 (9.0) 82 (33.6) 140 (57.4) 0.581; p < 0.001
Migraine with aura (ophthalmic headache) 16 (6.6) 34 (13.9) 0.032; p = 0.586
Tension-type headache 32 (13.1)
Chronic migraine 35 (14.3)
Medication overuse headache 31 (12.7)
Cluster hedache 2 (0.8) 2 (0.8) 7 (2.9) −0.013; p = 0.001
Other TACs 1 (0.4)
Trigeminal neuralgia 8 (3.3) 3 (1.2)
Headache attributed to trauma 5 (2.1) 32 (13.1) 8 (3.3)
Sinusitis 2 (0.8)
Headache attributed to cranial and/or cervical vascular disorder 16 (6.6) 6 (2.5)
Headache and arterial hypertension 10 (4.1) 5 (2.0)
Headache and systemic infection 6 (2.5) 1 (0.4)
Headache and anxiety disorder 3 (1.2)
Cervicogenic headache 1 (0.4)
  1. TACs trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias
  2. Triage nurses used the definition “ophthalmic headache” to indicate the diagnosis of “migraine with aura”
  3. The concordance between primary headaches diagnosis was assessed using the Cohen Kappa coefficient (κ). The significance level was set at 0.05
  4. There was not agreement between diagnoses made by ED physicians and headache centre